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WHAT IS THIS!! See Why Mexicans Find CORN SMUT, A Fungus As A Delicious Meal!

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Corn smut could be a fungus that turns normal corn kernels into tumor-like growths covered in blue-black spores. To the majority that’s a diseased corncob that must be thrown out; to the Mexicans, it’s a culinary specialty.

The fungus forms galls on all above-ground parts of corn species. While it’s technically a disease, corn smut may be a prized ingredient in Mexican cuisine, and an infected cob is worth significantly quite a daily one.


The bulbous blue-black galls that develop keep much of the flavor of the corn, but also contribute a nutty, mushroomy taste that creates it distinctly fungal. The culinary applications are myriad; the smoky, earthy flavor makes an honest accompaniment to fat in cheese and meats like chorizo.

It is sauteed with onions, epazote (a cilantro-like herb), and chilies, and also the resulting inky mixture enriches everything from tacos to tamales to omelets. Most ordinarily, it’s folded into a quesadilla with melted cheese and topped with salsas.


In recent years, because of Mexican immigration and epicurean demand (and clever rebranding some menus describe it as “Mexican truffles”), huitlacoche has become widely available in its native home and abroad.

Its status as a far sought-after delicacy remains a testament to the culinary ingenuity of the Aztecs: an outbreak on their staple crop was also a blessing in disguise.

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