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UNBELIEVABLE! See This Tribe In Adamawa That Bury Their Identical Children Alive To Prepare Them For Marriage

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The Koma people believe in the existence of a supreme being called Zum or Nu, otherwise meaning the sun. The neighboring Chamba also uses the same word Su for the sun, and for Almighty God.


For reasons too obvious to ignore, some have described the Koma people as ancient. Others, in their own observation, have termed them primitive. Whichever the case may be, the Koma people have refused to tag along with civilization.


In the Atlantika Mountains of Adamawa state, the Koma ethnic group is made up of people who are entirely committed to their traditional culture.


They share a border with Cameroon and are divided into three major groups: the hill-dwelling Beya and Ndamti, and the Vomni and Verre lowlanders. Scores of Nigerians, after the discovery, described the Koma people as primitive and pagan, and even named the mountain on which they live as Alantika which in Kanuri language means “Allah hasn’t yet arrived.”

This is because the Koma people still hold on to their ancient traditions and other religious practices, despite being surrounded by Islamic societies.


What perhaps shocked everyone was the discovery that among the Komas, a twin birth is regarded as evil, and they consider twins abominable to the extent- that until recently babies of multiple births used to be buried alive with the women who gave birth to them.

Though this act of twins killing is no more practiced among Komas who dwell on the plains, historical accounts suggest that the ancient practice is still happening in some settlements on the hills. It is documented that, between the ages of 10 and l4, children undergo puberty rituals which involve circumcision for boys and extraction of teeth for girls.

These are to prepare them for marriage and to show a sign of maturity. Women have their own farms separate from men The occupation of the Koma people is around farming, hunting, and gathering. Apart from hunting, both men and women engage in weeding and gathering and cultivation.


Though women often have their own farms separate from the men, both sexes sometimes help each other on their respective farms. The occupation of the Koma hill-dwellers centers on farming, hunting, and gathering.


Except for hunting, both men and women engage in cultivation, weeding, and gathering. Women often have their own farms separate from their male counterparts. However, both cooperate in helping with each others’ farms.

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